MOTH LIFE
Yellow-Horned Moths, 5-3-2014 by Dave - Mainly Moths on Flickr.

Continuing Mothoween’s theme of legends from around the world comes this one from Queensland.

The Legend

  A Queensland hunter went on a long journey, taking his small son with him. It was hard for the little boy to keep up with his father, and day by day he grew thinner and weaker. Then came the rains. They fell without stopping until rivers rose and the land became one vast swamp. The little boy became ill. The only thing his father could do was to build a rough shelter of bark and branches of trees to keep the rain off him. Their food supplies had long been exhausted, and the man knew that his son would die if he was not given nourishing food quickly.

He tucked the boy up in his kangaroo-skin rug and splashed through the marsh in search of game. It was not easy to find in the flooded land, but after several days he found a possum and killed it with his spear. He hurried back to the gunyah he had built, fearful that he might find his son lying there dead from starvation.

He arrived at the clearing, which he recognized by the broken branches of trees and the little mound that rose above the water, but of the gunyah and his son there was no sign. He could not understand what had happened. He had been prepared to find his son’s body, but the last thing he imagined was that it, and the little gunyah that sheltered it, would have disappeared as through by magic.

He leaned against a tree. His hand came in contact with a loose knob of bark and twigs on the trunk. He looked at it idly and then, with a sudden sense of shock, more closely, for it was a replica of the little gunyah he had built to shelter his son. He opened it with trembling fingers. Inside the case lay the white body of a grub, and he knew that the spirits had taken pity on the boy and saved him from death.

To this day the grub of the Case-moth always has a gunyah which it builds to protect it, and remind it of how, long ago, a father cared enough for his son to build a shelter for him while he sought for food.

The Science

The Psychidae—or bagworm moths indeed build little cases to protect themselves as caterpillars! This family is made up of around 1350 species, which is small for Lepidoptera, but impressive in the fact that they can be found all over the world. Before pupation, larvae make cases for themselves out of silk, sand, lichen, pebbles, and any other material they can get their grubby little legs on. Some bagworm cases can get to be 15 cm long! Many adult males don’t have fully developed mouth parts and therefore can’t feed. However, females can. Some species of bagworms are pests. In some species of bagworm, parthenogenetic reproduction can occur, which means viable eggs can be produced without male fertilization. Other species don’t lay eggs at all, with caterpillars simply emerging from the female’s body after she dies (they sound like chestbursters…). The moths that do lay eggs do so… inside their case.

http://www.rmwebed.com.au/hsie/y10/abc/dreamtime/dreamt_case_Moth.htm

http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/MISC/MOTHS/bagworm.htm

http://bugguide.net/node/view/11345

L. salicis.

L. salicis.

Providence saw fit to smile upon me and three moths were there to greet me on my last day of work. The last one I saved from drowning so that’s why it looks… yeah…

White Ermine time!

Also known as Spilosoma lubricipeda, this little guy is one of my favorites! In fact, it’s one of the species that made me like moths in the first place! It lives anywhere from Eurasia to Japan, and their wingspans are from 34-48 mm. They’re especially common in Great Britain, where they fly generally from May-July. They can come in an abundance of color variations depending on their habitat. Their larvae enjoy a wide range of plants to eat including alfalfa.

Photo credits:

http://www.insects.at/structure.php?mydir=Lepidoptera&view=Lepidoptera_Noctuoidea_Arctiidae

http://ukmoths.org.uk/show.php?bf=2060

http://www.treknature.com/gallery/Europe/Germany/photo124142.htm

http://www.commanster.eu/commanster/Insects/Moths/SpMoths/Spilosoma.lubricipeda.html

http://www.djibnet.com/photo/moth/right-wing-waving-white-ermine-481646187.html

Sorry for the lack of activity! Meanwhile have this Noctuid friend who visited me last night.

Sorry for the lack of activity! Meanwhile have this Noctuid friend who visited me last night.

After attending my brother’s graduation this weekend, I was fortunate enough to hike California’s own Channel Islands, and I came upon a plant chock full of these great Western Tussock larvae, Orgyia vetusta.

An interesting fact is adult females are wingless!

Be sure not to touch these caterpillars, though; many Tussock species have itchy urticating hairs which can cause a bad rash!

Ah, the micromoths! They’re exactly as they sound—small, more primitive moths. While this blog tends to focus on the macromoths, these little fellas need love too!

Ah, the micromoths! They’re exactly as they sound—small, more primitive moths. While this blog tends to focus on the macromoths, these little fellas need love too!

H. maia

H. maia

It’s all about T. velleda, guys.

It’s all about T. velleda, guys.